Saturday, June 23, 2012

"Head Study 062312"

This is my first weekend at AAU. My friend Fongwei Liu took me out the student dorm. I will spent a couple of days in his place. It happened to a be his open studio day today. We had a wonderful male model. Fongwei, myself, and two wonderful bay area artists painted together. To keep the continuity of my study at AAU. I still work on monochromatic paintings. I feel a little better than my previous portrait at AAU. The drawing part is relatively easy so I spend most of my time working on modeling. This painting is 11" x 14". I spent about 5 hours on it.

9 comments:

silentwitness said...

Very nice, timeless feeling to this and lots of expressive movement. Love it! This background recedes nicely even though the value contrast is not high. Would love to hear your thoughts on how you achieved such believable depth. And I am glad that you and Fongwei Liu are great friends!

Terry said...

Fantastic!!

Maria Randolph said...

This is awesome! You've achieved such depth and mood with this. Love it!

adebanji said...

Fantastic!

Pragya Tiwari said...

Stunning!

Millie said...

You're so talented, and lucky to have friends like Fong Wei Liu and ZhaoMing Hu. They will help you to achieve your goal even faster.

Fen Liu said...

Your figure drawing is very good. I also attend Academy of Art. I began taking online class last semester.

Fen Liu said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Young Vic said...

Often, if the skill is being used in a common or practical way, people will consider it a craft instead of oil painting. Likewise, if the skill is being used in a commercial or industrial way, it may be considered commercial art instead of fine art. On the other hand, crafts and design are sometimes considered applied art. Some art followers have argued that the difference between fine art and applied art has more to do with value judgments made about the art than any clear definitional difference.However, even fine art often has goals beyond pure creativity and self-expression. The purpose of works of art may be to communicate ideas, such as in politically, spiritually, or philosophically motivated art; to create belstaff jackets (see aesthetics); to explore the nature of perception; for pleasure; or to generate strong emotions. The purpose may also be seemingly nonexistent.