Sunday, May 24, 2009

"White Rose" --- Sold

Click Here to Bid

I don't remember I painted white roses before, but with this one, I was working on painting the colors of "white", I did similar study on white cups and drapery before, but I feel I am still not there yet. I really admire those master painters who can put many colors on a white object, but still be remarkably convincing the object is white. If you have experiences of doing that, would you mind share your two cents?

11 comments:

Barbara Woods said...

This rose and the similar pink rose are both my favorites of your paintings.

I have painted white flowers with watercolor doing very, very thin glazes of Winsor yellow, quinacridone red, and a blue in alternate layers - getting more yellow in the warmer areas and more blue in the cooler areas. I don't know if a similar process would work in oils.

Pam Holnback said...

I think you've done a great job w/ the white. I've always thought that the whites of Sargeant & Sorolla are some of the best.

Steven Patrick Brown said...

Hi Qiang, congratulations on the American Artist article.

I was wondering if could you tell me how long your paintings take to dry and how long you wait before varnishing them? When I’ve tried painting that thick with oils straight out of the tube they take weeks to dry and even then the paint forms a skin and is still soft underneath! I’ve tried adding drying mediums but the paint doesn’t hold the brush marks in the same way.

P.S. Love the white rose!

Jala Pfaff said...

I agree with Pam that Sargent and Sorolla have some of the best whites ever.
But you're doing just fine on your own. Love this rose.

pootpoot said...

@ Steven

I can't speak for Qiang, but it's not at all uncommon to wait six months or more for an oil painting to dry before varnishing it.

pootpoot said...

Qiang, I find the white of your rose and the translucency of its petals to be convincing. Only looking at the painting, I would've guessed the rose to be not purely white, but lightly creme (which is closer to the color of a white rose anyway).

pootpoot said...

@ Steven

www.qhart.com/Q_and_A/Q_and_A.htm

Evhe said...

Yes! I enjoy to watch your paintings, and especially the roses, day after day...
Thanks for your blog,
Evhe

steve strode said...

Hi Qiang-Huang. Hi. I am choosing you for the "Passion for Painting" Blog Award! If you are not familiar with it this is how it was described by the person, who nominated me.
‘… You can pass the award on to 5-7 others and link back to the one who passed it to you. ‘, If you are interested check my blog to cut and paste the award logo into yours. All the best, Steve Strode.
http://stevestrode.blogspot.com/

Jennifer McChristian said...

White can be a little tricky to paint, however, you seem to handle it with finesse.
The subtle color/temperature shifts in the rose are a feast for the eyes.
Well done!

Terry Daniels said...

I think of straight white out of the tube as a starting point. Getting that glow through translucent petals, for example, sometimes demands a straight unmixed yellow sitting in the middle of white that's been cut down with earth colors, or even mixed with black.

Real solid white is a rarity in the actual scene, IMO, so I think more in terms of lighter shades of color for things like a rose blossom.