Wednesday, July 30, 2008

"Dance of Light"

Click Here for Purchase Information

This painting took me four day. The past week, my time was fragmented for everything. In this painting, I was attracted by the light transmitted through the brown bottle and then casting on the vase. I don't know I depicted the effect or not. Working on a painting in multiple sessions is problematic to me. Colors (especially darks) dried between my painting sessions and showing inconsistency. Does anybody know how to fix this problem?

10 comments:

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

Qiang, you seem to be suffering from 'burnout' with your post about changing your style and being suddenly uninspired. That happens and it will pass.
This mood keeps you from seeing how good your paintings are at this time.
This is a beautiful painting.
Carry on. You Rock.

MadDogMcQ said...

Boy oh boy! The quality of your work knows no bounds Qiang! Problem? I see no problem - just a beautiful painting. You're VERY talented.

Lorrie Drennan said...

I put my paints in the freezer and it keeps them wet from one session to another. I turn my mixing pallette upside down and put it on top of my shallow pallette box with my paints in it and they all stay perfect in the freezer...even the thin smeared places on my mixing pallette. I saw on someone's blog where they had put their whole painting in the freezer to keep it wet till they could get back to it. For the little 6x8 daily paintings I think this would work great. Just put it in a sheet cake pan and either put it in one of those giant zip loc bags or cover it with foil.

Hope this helps you out. Your work is great! Hope your arm is better, too.

Skeet Sirmons said...

Daniel Greene sprays his paintings with retouch varnish. The retouch varnish actually brings the original color back to the darks. You can paint on it immediately after spraying.

Sherry Jo Horton said...

Your work is wonderful, your commitment to your work is wonderful - keep on keeping and don't be so hard on yourself.

WCaro said...

If the color is dry on the canvas, brushing lightly with a glaze of a transparent pigment works for me. Then I paint into the wet. If dry on the palette, the freezer idea above works great.
The canvas inside the freezer!? An idea to consider!
Dry or wet,that reflection on the ginger jar is beautiful!!

Dianne Mize said...

Appears you've already been given a couple of suggestions. Actually, retouch varnish works well. I usually use Liquin slightly thinned with turps or any glazing medium will do the job.

This is a beautiful painting, Qiang. It doesn't appear to have been done in several sessions, so whatever you did worked as well.

PAT MEYER -- said...

Your angles and movement of the light make this another masterpiece.

C. Robin Janning said...

Hello Qiang. I have just discovered your blog and I love your paintings. Your vision seems to capture the nuances of each image, which keeps everything fresh and alive.

Robin

Rusty Jones said...

I've used Liquin for years with good results. Let the painting dry then brush on a thinned (with turp) glaze of Liquin over the entire painting. This brings back all of the darks and allows you to work back into the painting with freh paint.